This section deals with research and analysis of Environment and Development related issues, carried out by Kalpavriksh. Following studies/reports are available for all those, who have interest on Environment and Development issues. Also, please do check out our other Publications

"Review and reformulation of Millennium Development Goals in 2015, is an opportunity to move towards goals based on sustainability and equity. This paper looks at prospects for India, within a global context.The Post-2015 framework for India-Indicators Table, by Ashish Kothari Feb 2013

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Countering Coal?

 Coal mining is devastating large forest and adivasi areas. Community Forest Rights under the Forest Rights Act may be one strong tool to counter it. This report shows how.

This study has been put together by Kanchi Kohli, Ashish Kothari and Priya Pillai, with inputs from Vinuta Gopal and Shiba Desor

 

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What Has Globalisation Meant for India? 

Economic globalisation since 1991 has caused enormous environmental damage, and made the situation of India's poorest people worse. This brochure shows how.

 

भारत में वैश्वीकरण: प्रभाव और विकल्प

 

पिछले दो दशकों के दौरान हमारे देश ने जबर्दस्त आर्थिक तरक्की की है। लेकिन इस कामयाबी का एक अंधकारमय पैलू भी है जो हमारी नजरों से ओझल या अनजान छूट गया है। मुल्क की आधी से ज्यादा आबादी या तो तरक्की की इस दौड़ में पिछे छूट गई है या इस तरक्की की कीमत चुका रही है। पर्यावरण को जो स्थायी नुकसान पहुंचा है सो अलग। वैश्विक विकास का मौजुदा ताना-बाना न तो पर्यावरणीय स्तर पर टिकाऊ है और न ही सामाजिक समानता के लिए अनुकूल है। ये हिंदुस्तान को और ज्यादा तीखे टकरावों व कष्टों की ओर धकेल रहा है। लेकिन दूसरी ओर हमारे सामने कई ऐसे वैकल्पिक तौर-तरीके और रास्ते भी हैं जिन पर चलते हुए हम धरती की सेहत को नुकसान पहुंचाए बिना एक ज्यादा समतापरक व खुशहाल भविष्य की तरफ बढ़ सकते है। यह रास्ता एक मूलभूत पर्यावरणीय लोकतंत्र का हिस्सा है।

 

प्रस्तुत प्रकशन में सबसे पहले हमने भारत में वैश्वीकरण के आर्थिक, सामाजिक और पर्यावरणीय आयामों के बारे में कुछ तथ्य दिए हैं। इसके बाद हमने उसके पर्यावरणीय प्रभावों का एक विस्त्रुत लेखा-जोखा तथा एक बेहतर भविष्य की ओर जाने वाले वैकल्पिक रास्ते सुझाए हैं।

 

 

Globalization Brochure (Hindi)

 

Also available in hard copy:

 

English: Contributory amount Rs. 40/-

 

Hindi: Contributory amount Rs. 50/-

 

KV CampaRevised 

Compensatory Afforestation and Net Present Value Payments for Diversion of Forest Land in India

India’s Constitution lists “Forests” in its Concurrent list, making it subject to the administration and management of both wings of a federal structure: the State and Central Governments. At the national level there are a range of laws and policies that have determined forest ownership and have put forth mechanisms that restrict or release forests to its “potential” users.......Read More

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Loss or Gain All the Same: The National Mission for a GreenIndia

by Kanchi Kohli and Manju Menon

In September 2010, the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) submitted its draft ‘National Mission for a Green India ‘ (from now on referred to as the Green India Mission or GIM) to the Prime Minister’s Council on Climate Change. This mission is one of the eight such missions which have been designed as part of India’s National Action Plan On Climate Change (NAPCC). It is important to note at the outset that the foremost principle of the NAPCC is that maintaining a high growth rate for the country is essential to increase the living standard of its people and reducing their vulnerability of climate change..... Read More

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Banking on Forests: Assets For A Climate Cure?

By Kanchi Kohli and Manju Menon

The governance of forests in India has been a complex realm to unravel. Due to the multiple claims to ownership, jurisdiction and management of forests through India's modern history, forests have remained a subject of intrigue for all those trying to understand the complex legalities that have operated within a single space. It is in this arena that the legal processes for the diversion of forests for non forest use has been practiced.

The strategies of valuation of and compensation of forest loss are central to forest regulation in India. They have converted forests into decontextualised, mobile and tradable commodities between regions. The present book seeks to explain how this is achieved and look at the continuity between the domestic regulation on forests and the new abstractions created by the climate change discourse in the form of REDD and REDD+. While the models of valuation differ, the effects on the commodification of forests deepen as greater mobility is created and trading across countries and continents is made possible through real time climate mitigation plan and forestry schemes.

Check out the Content Listing

The financial support for this study was received from Heinrich Boll Foundation.

Note: Two Briefing Papers on Compensatory Afforestation Planning and Management Authority (CAMPA) and a critque of the National Mission for Green India will also soon be available in electronic form. Please let us know if you would like to receive copies of the same.

For copies please write to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Contact for authors: Kanchi Kohli ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Manju Menon ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

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Pocketful of Forests- Legal debates around compensation and valuation of forest loss in India

By Kanchi Kohli, Manju Menon, Vikal Samdariya, Sreetama Guptabhaya Rs. 200/-

Diversion or dereservation of forest land for non-forest uses such as mining and industry comes with the mandatory condition of compensatory afforestation. This is to be undertaken as per the guidelines of the Ministry of Environment and Forests. Over the years, the poor implementation of this condition has come under scrutiny. Initiated by the Supreme Court, the debates and deliberations drew in the Central Empowered Committee, the Ministry of Environment and Forests and several legal and forestry experts to find a way to improve implementation. This process put into place a standardised system of valuating forests that are proposed for diversion, based on the ‘goods and services’ provided by them. It has also resulted in the creation of an institutional network comprising forest officials, experts and politicians at the Centre and the States for the collection and disbursal of funds collected on account of diversion or dereservation.

This present book “Pocketful of Forests: Legal debates around compensation and valuation of forests in India”, examines the steps that led to the setting up of the Compensatory Afforestation Planning and Management Authority (CAMPA) and the method of calculating the Net Present Value (NPV) of forests. The arguments that have taken place between the judiciary, the executive and the Parliament since 1999 are valuable material for those interested in matters of forest conservation and forest governance. They touch upon Centre-State relations, the political, administrative and technical notions of forests and the role of negotiation in policy-making.

Check out the Content List

This report was supported by WWF-India's Civil Society Collaboration for Environment Governance Initiative.

For copies please contact, Vikal Samdariya ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or write to the Kalpavriksh email IDs ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

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India’s Notified Ecologically Sensitive Areas

By Meenakshi Kapoor, Kanchi Kohli and Manju Menon Rs.150

This document is the first comprehensive compilation of Ecologically Sensitive Areas (ESAs) and the range of issues associated with them. It traces the chronology of the notifications declaring ESAs in India using the Environment Protection Act, 1986.

Full report (for download)

For hard copy of this publication, write to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. orThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Read the Reviews:

Civil Society/Frontline/EPW
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Calling the Bluff: Revealing the state of Monitoring and Compliance of Environmental Clearance Conditions

By Kanchi Kohli and Manju Menon with Sanchari Das and Divya Badami Rs.150

This study takes a close look at the level of compliance achieved by projects that are granted environment clearance by the Ministry of Environment and Forests under the EIA notification.

For copy of this publication, write to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. orThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Read the Reviews:

Civil Society/Down To Earth/ Frontline/Canara Times

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Undermining India: Impacts of Mining on Ecologically Sensitive Areas

BY Neeraj Vagholikar and Kaustubh Moghe, with Ritwick Dutta2003, reprinted in 2004 Rs. 75

This study takes a close look at the Existing and proposed mining activities threaten ecologically sensitive areas across India. These include protected areas and wildlife corridors; other areas rich in biodiversity and crucial water catchments. Many of these areas are also home to tribal peoples and other communities whose livelihood security is threatened by mining.

For copy of this publication, write to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

National Environment Policy 2004: A Critique

A bold, forward-looking policy dealing with India's environmental crisis, is an urgent necessity. The Government of India is to be commended for initiating the process. The draft NEP makes an attempt to tackle what is undoubtedly a complex subject, for environmental destruction and conservation are intricately linked to economic, social, and political aspects of life in India.

Unfortunately, thought it provides a fair diagnosis of the crisis we face, the draft NEP falls  seriously short of pointing to the fundamental changes needed in development and economic planning, and governance or decision-making regarding natural resources, that would put India onto a path of sensitive, sustainable development. This is perhaps not entirely surprising, given that it has been formulated in an essentially non-participatory manner, failing to involved the most important sections of Indian society that depend on natural resources for their direct life and livelihood.

Read More...