CCAs are not an isolated phenomenon only in India, such examples are found all across the world and are embedded in many cultures. South Asia, in particular, is rich in its cultural diversity and has been home to many ancient civilizations. There are numerous examples of CCAs in countries like Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

There are many customary ICCAs within PAs and forest areas.  There are also standardized, government-designed local institutions in "conservation areas,"  buffer zones, and community forests which arguably sometimes constitute legally-recognized ICCAs.  In many cases, however, these may be more accurately considered to be shared governance arrangements rather than ICCAs.

In Nepal, there are many customary ICCAs within PAs and forest areas. There are also standardized, government-designed local institutions in "conservation areas," buffer zones, and community forests which arguably sometimes constitute legally-recognized ICCAs. In many cases, however, these may be more accurately considered to be shared governance arrangements rather than ICCAs. In 2006 the governance of Kangchenjunga Conservation Area was handed over to a management council of representatives from local governments and NGOs -- the first time a government-recognized protected area can be considered to be an ICCA

Pakistan has adopted a pioneering policy of allowing highly regulated and monitored trophy hunting of some species. The resources thus generated go towards community development while the community ensures that the species population is well maintained.

Bangladesh is one of the world’s most densely populated countries, CCAs have been an important part of the network of common pool resources, both terrestrial and aquatic area have been protected and managed by communities. In the recent times many factors have contributed towards their sharp decline.

Community involvement in conservation is definitely not a modern concept in Sri Lanka either.  The ancient systems of tenure as well as practices, customs and taboos resulted in an elaborate scheme of ‘rules’ that promoted environmental friendly practices.

Community Conserved Areas in South Asia: Case studies and analyses from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, Ed. by S. Bhatt, N. Pathak Broome, A. Kothari, and T. Balasinorwala, published by Kalpavriksh, India and released at CBD COP 11 (Hyderabad, Oct 2012):  Five country reports that appear in the CD in the CCA South Asia Publication